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Bathroom Remodel

How To Avoid These Top 10 Mistakes Homeowners Typically Make In Home Remodeling

1. Don’t Hire the Wrong Guy.
The number one home remodeling mistake people make while remodeling their home’s is hiring the wrong contractors. Hiring the wrong guy can make your life miserable and make you regret ever trying to improve your home in the first place. Make sure you investigate a proposed contractors credentials and get referrals. When considering a home remodeling contractor a good place to start is your local BBB. From there use common sense and ask questions. If something doesn’t feel or sound right move on to the next guy until you are comfortable. Lastly, get Everything in writing, you’ll be glad you did.
2. Do Your Research.
Being well informed about not only your home but the options you have and housing trends will prevent you from making big mistakes down the road. For instance even if you love pink walls and paneling its probably not a good idea to install them in your house. You may love it and if you never plan on selling or having company then great go for it, make yourself happy. But resale should always be kept in mind since you never truly know what the future will bring.
3. Honey Do, Doesn’t Always Mean Honey Can.
Keep your own abilities in mind. It is better to hire a professional for a task that you are sure you do not know how to do. By the time you figure it out, you will have more money and time involved than hiring a professional from the start. Save money and build sweat equity by accomplishing tasks you are comfortable with. You will not be doing yourself any favors by doing shoddy work on your home. Poor workmanship stands out and never adds value to your home.
4. Plan for the Future.
When Home Remodeling consider how changing life styles will be accommodated by your home. If you finish your basement for a play area for your kids it would be a good idea to run wiring for media areas, or pool table lighting so that when the kids out grow the play room you can easily covert the function of the space without elaborate remodeling costs.
5. Don’t Throw Good Money at Bad Money.
Make sure you take into account long term home remodeling goals. It doesn’t make sense to install new flooring this spring if you plan to build a room addition in the fall. Make long term goals and follow them. Make sure that you tackle tasks in the right order to prevent double paying or getting stuck short of your goals.
6. Don’t Band-Aid a Mistake.
If you put a Band-Aid on a mistake it’s a mistake with a Band-Aid on it. Make sure you are not covering up problems but instead addressing them properly. For instance, if you open up a bathroom wall and you see mold and structural water damage address the new found issues before covering them up. Putting a Band-Aid on it, or covering up the issue will only prolong your problems.
7. Allocate Enough Money.
Due to the common occurrence of unforeseen issues it is always a good Idea to allocate 10–15% in addition to your proposed budget. Having the extra money available will make life a lot easier if problems occur. Not much could be worse than running out of money before completion.
8. PPPPPP.
The old six P’s from college also applies to your home remodeling projects. Proper prior planning prevents poor performance. Make sure the plan is clear and your budget allocated before beginning. Making changes in the middle can jack the price through he roof. Re-designing your original plans mid-way through the remodeling phase always affects construction schedules and always increases the cost of your original plan.
9. See it Through.
When getting involved in any home remodeling project be prepared to go the distance with it. Often times unforeseen issues arise and need to be addressed accordingly. Stopping short will leave you with a half finished look.
10. Selecting the Wrong Materials.
It is a common mistake to select materials that by themselves look great, but when combined with other selections just do not work. Common examples are flooring, paint color, wall and floor tile, countertop selections and even lighting and fixtures. A good tip is when planning your project attain samples of each product so that the items can be physically placed together providing you an actual visualization of the final result. There’s nothing worse than realizing after your home remodeling project is done that, the colors and designs you have chosen clash or just don’t compliment each other well. Do not forget this important step.

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Home Maintenance

Homeowners Should Take Advantage of This Recession by Doing Home Remodeling Projects

Homeowners in this economy have seemed to put the brakes on doing any remodeling growth to their home. But in all essence, this is the time for homeowner’s should take charge and take advantage of the recession by implementing home improvement jobs to their home, therefore getting a substantial return on their investment, which is a sure thing.
Since World War II, the United States has never seen such a down market in the real estate business. All the while, homeowner’s are waiting patiently for some kind of sign for our economy to move upward again. Homeowner’s are scared to enter the market place and suffer a big loss. But while waiting for the economy to improve, homeowner’s should definitely take advantage of this slow time. To increase the appeal of their home, home remodeling historically guarantee’s a definite return on investment on their home. For those homeowner’s who want to eventually sell their home, there are some things that they can get done on their home now and be a step ahead of the game later.
On the Exterior of the Home: A neat and nice landscape most always is the first thing that a potential buyer will see when they come to look at your home. Why not invest in your yard? Design your landscape early and plant accordingly, this ensures your yard will be ready. This also gives the plants time to mature and establish themselves to look their best next year and every year after that. Painting the exterior of the home and painting the trim gives the home a new, polished look. New paint is a great return on your investment. Replace the siding if painting is not an option for you. Rotten siding is a noticeable eyesore to potential buyers and also welcomes into your home a number of different rodents and insects just waiting to take refuge in your home. Replace the roof with a top-quality shingle. Broken shingles, missing shingles, and miss-matched shingles take away the beauty of your home. If the roof is fairly new, but is leaking in sots, fix the roof leaks as soon as possible.
As for the Interior of you home: Painting the inside of your home will there again gives your home a brand new, fresh look and also gives you a secure continuation of return on investment. Remodeling the kitchen and bathroom(s) are essential in bringing your home’s value and beauty up to speed. Updating these most important rooms is important because these rooms are the most used by almost everyone who visits or lives in the home. Depending on the style you choose to remodel and decorate them, it will bring certain flair and add contrast to your home. Take advantage of your attic space. Many people have a lot of clutter and like to hoard items that are either out of date or things that they really do not need anymore. Clearing out rooms with clutter will give your home more space and will give your home a more impressive and roomier atmosphere. Repair and/or replace all the plumbing and electrical outlets and, if need be, wire or re-wire your home to be more energy efficient. To update your most prized investment, replace your windows with beautiful Sheffield Windows.
Now is the perfect time to do this. Hire a professional carpet cleaner to come in and clean all your carpets, or if you want to mix things up a bit, replace all carpet with hardwood floors. Hardwood flooring is beautiful, lasts a very long time, and is simple and easy to clean and take care of. Replace your light fixtures. This is a very small change, but a very positive change it is! Changing light fixtures puts a whole new spin on the room, makes light hit in all the right places, giving the room a beautiful, dimensional spectrum effect. All of these possible home remodeling jobs can add years to your home, not to mention adding incredible value to the home and giving you, the homeowner, and a substantial return on your investment. Your home is your biggest investment you will probably make in your life, make it one that not only you will love and be proud of, but for others as well to love and to call home.

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Home Improvement Contractors

Attn: Contractors: Create a Stress-Free Experience For Homeowners Using These Five Simple Tips

Building or renovating a home can be stressful for your customers. That’s because having a contractor in is just another activity happening in an already busy household. Your customer may be juggling a stressful job, nightly little league practices, a sick pet, or a score of other issues. And now that they’ve decided to have work done to their home, they’ll have to add “inaccessible home” to their itinerary of things to deal with. It all can get very overwhelming for your customer.
Whether you’re a plumber, electrician, home builder or remodeler, it’s important to keep in mind that you do this kind of stuff everyday; for your customer, this may be a once-in-a-lifetime event. And they’re going to stress out about it. Here are five ways to show your customer a little TLC during a home renovation to keep them-and you-stress-free.
1. Educate them from the start
As a contractor, you’re used to the steps involved in a home renovation. They might include things like inspecting the home, pulling a permit, contacting the local code department, and ordering supplies from vendors. You have a system in place that allows you to get jobs done on time and within budget. Your homeowner customer, however, only knows that they want their bathroom remodeled. They may not know all the steps involved or how you get from A to B, so it’s important to educate them from the start. Advice? The minute they sign on the dotted line, hand them a checklist of all the steps you’ll be taking to renovate their home with a brief description of each step. Not only will it avoid confusion later, but allowing your customer to follow along and cross completed steps off the list will let them know that progress is being made. And of course, answer any and all questions they have.
2. Avoid industry lingo
As a contractor you’re used to throwing around words like “below grade,” “back nailing,” and “blind stop.” It’s easy to forget that the homeowner may have no idea what those terms mean. The best way to confuse them and make them stress out even more is to use industry lingo when describing their project without an explanation. Try to avoid slang around your customer, unless he is educated about your line of work. Describing each step and the parts needed for each step in a way they understand (without belittling their intelligence) goes a long way in maintaining a healthy working relationship with your customer.
3. Slow down and spend the time
When it comes to remodeling a home, things can move pretty quickly. You may have to wait for a permit to be accepted, for example, but once it is, it’s off to the races! As a contractor you’ll be ready to pick up the pace and get the project on its way. But slow down a minute. Now that you’re ready to move full-steam ahead, have you informed the homeowner? If not, take a step back and remember the checklist advice we gave in Tip #1. Before moving ahead, take the time to alert the homeowner about the next couple of steps, explain what’s going to be happening, and answer any questions they may have as you prepare to move forward. This will give the homeowners time to process what will be happening and allow them to prepare for the next phase of work. Continue to do this as the project progresses through the various stages. Which leads to the next piece of advice…
4. Keep in regular contact with your customer during the project
A lot of contractors make the mistake of communicating only twice with the customer during a home remodel: in the beginning when they start the work, and at the end when they expect payment. It’s understandable why this happens: contractors get busy, they have other customers and other jobs. But it’s a habit that can-and should-be broken if you want to offer your customer a stress-free experience. If not, your customer will be left holding a checklist of steps that you provided with no idea what step you’re on. The number of times you reach out to the customer will ultimately be determined by the length of the project, and is best determined by you. If it’s a weeks-long project, for example, stay in touch with your customer, say, at least once a week. The last thing you want is the homeowner calling you, saying he was wondering what was going on because he hasn’t heard from you in awhile.
5. Stay in touch after the project is complete
Another mistake contractors make once a home remodel is done is to cash the check and move on. Again, this is understandable because contractors have other contracts and other customers. But by failing to follow up with a customer or keep in contact with them once their project is done, you’re potentially missing out on a key thing that’ll keep you in business-more work. That’s because a contractor who asks to stay in touch with a customer-and then does-will be remembered by that customer, who in turn may have another project down the road, or will refer you to a friend of neighbor. So remember to always stay in front of your customers-past and present. That might mean a monthly newsletter full of home remodeling tips, requests for referrals, friendly emails, follow up phone calls to gauge their happiness with the project, an e-zine, holiday cards, mailers with current offers, etc. It doesn’t always matter how you stay in touch, just that you do.
These are only five ways to show a little TLC to your customers and ensure that they have a stress-free experience with you. They’re simple and easy to implement. Putting them into place will mean you’ll have a long list of happy customers who’ll be happy they signed on the dotted line-and who’ll refer more and spend more on your services in the future.

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Room Additions

A Homeowner’s Guide to Creating a Successful Relationship With Your Contractor

There are tons of websites and consumer advocacy groups dedicated to informing the public about shady contractors, offering tips on finding reputable ones, and dispensing advice on what to do if you’ve been scammed by a less-than-reputable contractor. But there’s not a lot of talk out there about homeowners who’ve created a less-than-friendly job site for their contractor. Shady homeowners, you say? Believe it or not, they’re out there. Just ask a contractor. He could probably tell you a story or two.
Nightmare on Contractor Street
Ever hear of the homeowner who asked her contractor to revise their invoice to her exact specifications, then take five weeks to pay the bill? Or the couple who was sent a quote for some work, and then came out of the woodwork two years later wanting the contractor to do the work and oh yeah, wanted the contractor to hold the price? Or the malicious guy who, after the contractor gave him everything promised in the contract, tried to hold the contractor for breach of contract and thought yelling obscenities at the top of his lungs would intimidate the contractor into confessing a falsehood? These are all true stories.
And you thought some contractors were bad…
Seriously though, there are bad contractors out there who make false claims as to the performance of a material, try to sell you things you don’t need in order to make a few extra bucks, flat out lie about their skills and experience, or simply disappear mid-project. It’s unfortunate that a few baddies have given the whole construction/remodeling industry a black eye and a bad reputation. Because really, there are way more reputable contractors than shysters out there, despite the horror stories you might have heard about the glut of shady characters polluting the construction industry.
And most times, shady contractors are silent deal breakers-they take without asking, they disappear without telling, and they lie without announcing their fibs. Shady homeowners, on the other hand, are loud with their complaints, fly off the handle when they think they’ve been stiffed, or say and do bizarre things in order to get out of paying the bill. What’s an honest, hard-working, legit contractor to do when faced with such a formidable customer? Not much, especially when the saying is, “The customer is always right.”
Don’t be a shady homeowner: Let us show you the way
Now, there may be some situations that are innocent enough, but because of miscommunication, or non-communication, or whisper-down-the-lane, may be misconstrued as one party trying to take advantage of the other party. It happens. So to avoid that, following is a guide for homeowners on how to create a successful relationship with a contractor.
Tip #1 – Don’t ask for quotes if you’re not serious about moving forward
Think long and hard about the project you have in mind before contacting contractors for quotes. Is this something you have the time, energy, and money to tackle in the coming weeks or months? If not, consider putting the project on hold until the time is right for you. Here’s why: whether you’re a returning customer or a new client, most contractors will jump through hoops to get you a comprehensive quote in a timely fashion. That’s because most contractors are ready, willing and able to continue an existing relationship or establish a new one. What company wouldn’t? So if you go into the quoting process intending to not follow through and not have the work done, it’s a waste of the contractor’s time-and yours. The time the contractor spent on a quote for the project you don’t intend to start is time he could’ve spend on a quote for someone who is serious about moving forward-either with him or another contractor. Either way, a contractor wants to know if a signed contract is on the way or a “Thanks for your time, but I’ve chosen someone else.”
Bottom Line: It’s okay to tell a contractor you’ve chosen someone else. Honestly. They can take it. They wouldn’t be in the remodeling business if they couldn’t deal with rejection. Besides, contractors want closure just like anyone else. Let them know so they can move on.
Tip #2 – If you don’t know how much something costs, it’s okay to admit it-and then ask for a ballpark first
It’s understandable that sometimes things cost more than you thought they would. A large gourmet kitchen with the latest and greatest appliances? We all know that’ll cost a bundle. An addition on the back of your house? Yeah, you can kind of anticipate that being costly too. But installing insulation in your home? Not a lot of homeowners know the cost of something like that. That’s especially true with spray foam insulation because it’s still a relatively new product in the residential market. Sticker shock is sometimes par for the course-and a potential deal breaker. To avoid that, ask the contractor if he can give you a ballpark figure first, based on information you provide or a site visit. (It’s okay to admit that you don’t know how much something costs. Really. Reputable contractors will educate you, rather than take advantage of that fact.)
Every contractor is different, so depending on what type of work you’re having done, a ballpark can be done over the phone or during a walk-through. That’ll let the contractor know that you’re interested, but not to work on a formal, written proposal just yet because your decision to move forward might ultimately come down to price. And that’s okay. If you can’t afford something, you can’t afford something. A contractor will actually be thankful that you didn’t waste too much of his time on something that you simply won’t be able to afford in the long run. Of course, it’s also the responsibility of the contractor to educate the homeowner upfront about the available options to put things in perspective, so that sticker shock doesn’t set in too late or that price isn’t the only reason you walked if it’s something you can afford but are hesitant to purchase. And if you take the next step and ask for a formal proposal in writing, keep in mind during the decision-making process that choosing the cheapest contractor can backfire on you.
Tip #3 – If you’re not a chef, stay out of the kitchen
There’s no easy way to say it, so let’s just put it out there: If you’re not the primary decision maker, kindly stay out of the equation. Couples shop together and make joint decisions about purchases. But at some point during the process, usually during installation, one person in the couple assumes the responsibility of being the point of contact with the contractor. Just like contractors have project managers that oversee projects, one person within the couple becomes the project manager for the homeowner team-the person in charge of representing the couple, making decisions on their behalf. Things work best when there’s a leader for each party involved, moving the project forward, keeping things on target. The minute that someone else gets involved is the minute that the project gets complicated-there are suddenly too many chefs in the kitchen making things more disorganized and chaotic than they need to be.
Bottom line: if there’s a leader for each party, and each leader is communicating effectively, and if the project is running smoothly, there should be no need to involve anyone else.
Tip #4 – For goodness sake, research the contractor!
It goes without saying, but you should do some digging on any contractor you intend to hire. Ask around. Do a Google search. Look at the Better Business Bureau website for any negative feedback. You wouldn’t buy a car without researching it first and taking it for a test drive, right? So why would you blindly hire a contractor to work on your home? Your house just may be your biggest investment, so don’t hire just anyone to work on it. Contact several competing contractors, tell them about your project, set up a site visit (if need be), get a proposal in writing, ask for referrals. A lot of homeowners skip some or all of these crucial steps and then wonder why they had a bad experience with the contractor they’ve chosen. Take your time to research and go through the motions-you’ll be glad you did.
Tip #5 – Don’t quibble over minor imperfections
Handcrafted work is unique because not all pieces are alike. There are bound to be imperfections because human hands are not infallible. Only machines designed for mass production can achieve the type of cookie-cutter perfection you may be looking for. And even machines aren’t infallible, either. Spray polyurethane foam insulation is a good example of a “handcrafted” product. Home-improvement shows may depict a perfect wall cavity where the spray foam is flush with the studs and has an even, uniform appearance. In reality, because this product is spray applied by a (human) installer using what can only be described as a gun with hoses attached, the overall appearance will have peaks and valleys. What’s more, spray foam expands as it’s applied, so it may expand more in some areas and less in others, also attributing to the uneven appearance. If an installer is worth his salt, any area he spray foams will have an overall tolerance of +/- 0.5″ so the uneven appearance isn’t glaringly noticeable to the eye. If the peaks and valleys are extreme and clearly noticeable, that may be a sign of an inexperienced installer.
Bottom line, though, is this: it takes time, dedication and good hand-eye coordination to hand-make, hand-craft, or hand-paint anything. It requires skills that a lot of people don’t have, and it’s a dying art. Production lines lorded over by robots and large machines have quickly replaced goods made from scratch by human hands-an extension of our desire for cheap goods delivered fast. Take heart in the fact that if your contractor is handcrafting something for you, he is creating it with your individual tastes and needs in mind, something no machine can accomplish.
Tip #6 – It’s a work site, not a museum
Anytime you have work done to your home, it’s going to get dirty. And there will be noise from power tools and construction equipment. It’s par for the course when you undertake a renovation project. Want a constant state of order and cleanliness in your home? Don’t ever have work done to your home. Take heart – if you’ve chosen the right contractor, your house is in good hands. A little dirt won’t hurt, and can easily be cleaned up. Try to avoid following your contractor around the house, broom in hand. (Seriously, it happens.) Not only will you be in the contractor’s way, impeding his progress, but you’ll be showing that you don’t trust the contractor will clean up his mess. What’s more, you’re wasting your time tidying up behind your contractor. What you clean will get dirty again in a manner of minutes.
Keep in mind the noise and dirt are only a temporary inconvenience. Just think of the finished product! But if you’re the type that, for whatever reason, doesn’t like to be around construction sites, vacate the house while the work is being done. If someone must be there with the contractor, leave someone else in your family in charge. By the time you return, the work will probably be done!
There you have it-six ways to avoid being a nuisance homeowner. If you follow these tips, you’ll have a successful relationship with any contractor you hire. You don’t want to risk ruining your relationship with your contractor, right? After all, you may need their help for future projects.